Friday, April 8, 2016

npm pmmu #8: ol' blue eyes

from The Alchemist's Kitchen
This month I'm posting daily Poetry-Music Match-Ups, and you're invited to join me! (See the bottom of the post  for ideas.)  When I don't have a crowd-sourced combo scheduled, I'll share one of my own many, many PMMUs!  If something comes to your mind, send it to me HERE.

Today Diane Mayr of Random Noodling is matching us up crooner-style.  She writes,"I love Frank Sinatra.  His interpretations of songs changed over his long career.  A good example of this is "East of the Sun and West of the Moon.""


From 1940 with the Jimmy Dorsey Band




and from 1960

Diane says, "I prefer the simpler, more innocent, 1940s version.  I wonder about how he might have sung it, though, in 1998 before he died?"

"Undone Song at Neap Tide" by Kathryn Starbuck (2005), strikes me as a look at a relationship that's gone beyond the "we'll share a dream of love, Dear," and has come out somewhere on the other side.

Undone Song at Neap Tide || Kathryn Starbuck
When the sun and moon were in quadrature, when   
the garden had become a wilderness and the clock refused to strike

When the old year died and the sand walked into
the sea with the neap tide

When you had been too long away and your old snowblue footprints
clotted and hesitated in the clay

When the worry of this undone song unsung so long
so loud my head I went inside and under to let the flood run free
*********************
From the bit of information Diane found about the poet, she appears to have come out grieving the death of her husband, but she also thinks the poem is about coming out into a life formerly unexplored. With Diane, I am "totally enchanted by the sound of the last stanza, and the meaning of the poem is almost irrelevant!"

Thank you, Diane--I know a lot of music, but Frank Sinatra's oeuvre is not in my musical file cabinet!  This is why I'd love to have you, Dear Reader, send me your own match-up--we all need to broaden our horizons, poetic and otherwise!

In case you've missed the rest of this week's Poetry-Music Match-ups and have some time to explore, scroll down or click the links.

April
1 Introduction and "Paul Simon reunion" with Violet Nesdoly
2 "When You Are Old" and "When I'm Sixty-Four" with Harry Yeatts
3 The Poetry Friday Anthology for Science and "She Blinded Me with Science"
4 "Martin Luther King Day" and "Pride (in the Name of Love)"
5 "I Lived" and "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" with Petrina Hollingsworth
6 "What Do You Believe a Poem Shd Do?" and "Cold Water"
7 "Color Feel" and "Roy G. Biv" with Mitch Friedman

Laura Putrid I mean Purdie Salas is our host today at Writing the World for Kids.  Wallow in the wonder of Poetry Friday!

Again, you are welcome to suggest a match-up--take your pick and send it to me!

·      your own poem with music that you've realized goes with it,
·      your own music with a poem that goes with it,
·      someone else's poem with someone else's music to match, 
·      song lyrics that you find particularly poetic,
·      poems written AS song lyrics
·      poems inspired by songs,
·      songs written about poems, 
·      poems written about songs, 
·      favorite nursery rhymes (which often have tunes),
·      and any other poetry-music combinations that make sense to you.

5 comments:

  1. Thanks for featuring my match-up today, Heidi. Over on my blog I have a look at the man, Brooks Bowman, who wrote the song "East of the Sun and West of the Moon," and Sarah Vaughan's version of it.

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  2. Interesting perspective on how our passions change over the years. Sinatra's voice got more rich and complicated as he went along. Great poem, too, if challenging and sad. We all have unsung songs, unsaid words.

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  3. Oh my goodness--yes on that last stanza. Glorious. OK. This weekend, I WILL come up with a PMMU to send you. I swear. These are so much fun. Signed, Laura Putrid ;>)

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  4. I'm enjoying humming along with you and your contributers!

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  5. What a thoughtful, haunting match up.

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