Monday, April 4, 2022

npm 4: biophilic design

  

Biophilic Design


Once upon a Sunday,

Augie in his panda hat

builds a fairy house–

no roof except the sky,

no walls except the tulips.

The gate is a brick split in

two, recovered; pass through 

the grand halves on a path of 

pink sand. Visit the library

stacked with woodchip books.

Is it raining? Duck under 

lean-to slabs of bark.

Is it cold? Gather round

the fire pit ringed with 

pebble seats. There’s no 


other place on earth like 

this one–the warm, the cool, 

the found forms under the 

living light; the small besotted 

hand of Augie weighing the world,

writing the story of this place, 

the story of us returned to fairies,

outside in, inside out, refreshed.


draft ©HM 2022

 

In "Buildings Designed for Life," Amanda Sturgeon reminds us that it's only in the last hundred years that humans became primarily inside creatures who spend 90% of our time indoors. She envisions a built environment that remembers that buildings are "actually, rightfully, human habitats," and that for thousands of years we built our homes in, around and through nature, not removed from it. Philia, love--and bio, life--demand a new way of designing buildings that connect and respond to their environment.  Augie's fairy house made me wish I were that small, that free.

 

🌍🌎🌏🌍🌎🌏🌍🌎🌏🌍🌎🌏🌍🌎🌏🌍🌎🌏🌍🌎🌏🌍🌎

My project for NPM 2022:
 
This month I'm "Mak[ing] human stories to move human beings.  Human stories are more powerful for inciting action than counting carbon or detailing melting glaciers." (Favianna Rodriguez, from her essay "Harnessing Cultural Power," in ALL WE CAN SAVE.)

My challenge to myself is to center our fabulous, ferocious human stories in the poems I write in response to ALL WE CAN SAVE--not my standard approach to writing, which usually centers...well, me.

"It isn't a matter of moving climate change further up our priority list. The reason we care about [climate change] is because it affects everything that's already at the top of our priority list: our health, our families, our jobs and the economy, the well-being of our communities... To care about a changing climate we don't have to be a tree hugger or an environmentalist (though it certainly helps); as long as we are humans alive today, then who we already are, and what we already care about, gives us all the reasons we need."

Katharine Hayhoe, "How to Talk About Climate Change,"
ALL WE CAN SAVE: TRUTH, COURAGE, AND SOLUTIONS FOR THE CLIMATE CRISIS

 



2 comments:

  1. This is a magical story poem! I love everything about it-- the tulip walls, the wood chip books, the pink sand! And I really love those last two lines! I also love Sturgeon's thinking about inside and outside. Really interesting! And it makes me imagine what I would like my next house to be like! Thank you!

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  2. I was right there with Augie, channeling my inner imaginative eight year-old self!

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Thanks for joining in the wild rumpus!